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 • Guide to the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act
Revised: Mar. 3, 2009 

This information was prepared by CPSC staff, has not been reviewed or approved by, and many not necessarily reflect the 

views of, the Commission. It may be subject to change based on Commission action. 

Guide to the Consumer Product 

Safety Improvement Act 

(CPSIA) 

for 

Small Businesses, Resellers, 

Crafters and Charities 

Page 1 

Introduction 

The Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) is a sweeping new law that 

impacts a broad spectrum of our economy. From manufacturers of toys to the kids 

that play with them, everyone is affected in some way #amp;#8208;#amp;#8208; even those who make and 

donate products to hospitals and charities. 

There are new rules to be understood and adopted for everyone from the largest 

global manufacturer to the crafter working in the family workshop to the mom#amp;#8208;andpop 

shop on the corner. Indeed, all children뭩 products including toys, books, child 

care articles and clothing are covered in different ways by this law, and there are 

different rules for different products. 

Although the information here does not speak to every aspect of the law, it does 

address some of the more frequently asked questions that many small manufacturers, 

shop owners and consignment/thrift store owners have asked about the CPSIA. New 

information is coming out frequently, so sign up today to receive e#amp;#8208;mail updates. 

Page 2 

Contents 

Guidance for Retailers and Resellers of Children뭩 Products, including Thrift 

Stores, Consignment Shops and Charities 

Question 14: Do I need to test the products I sell? 10 

Question 15: How can I determine if something has lead in it before I sell it? 10 

Table C: Commonly Resold Children뭩 Products and Materials 11 

Question 16: How can I tell if a product contains a prohibited phthalate before I sell it? 12 

Question 17: Can I sell vintage children뭩 books or other children뭩 products that are 

collectibles? 

12 

Question 18: Do bikes need to comply with the lead limits? 12 

Question 19: What happens if I sell a product in violation of the CPSIA or other applicable laws? 12 

More Information 

13 

Page 

Guidance for Small Manufacturers, Importers, and Crafters of Children뭩 Products 

Question 1: Who is considered a manufacturer? 3 

Question 2: Am I affected? 3 

Question 3: What is a children#39;s product? 3 

Question 4: Do all children#39;s products require testing? What requirements do I need to meet? 4 

Table A: Compliance and Testing Timetable 4 

Question 5: For testing and certification that is now required, what do I need to do? 5 

Question 6: Do I have to test every single product? 5 

Question 7: When testing and certification is not yet required, what do I need to do? 6 

Question 8: Are there exemptions/exclusions to meeting the lead content limits? 6 

Question 9: What should I do if I learn that my product does not comply? 6 

Table B: List of materials and components 7 

Question 10: What are phthalates? 8 

Question 11: What products are covered by the prohibition on the use of phthalates? 8 

Question 12: Does the packaging of a product have to comply with the phthalates ban? 8 

Question 13: Can I donate the children뭩 products that I make to local charities and hospitals? 9 

Page 3 

Guidance for Small Manufacturers, Importers 

and Crafters of Children뭩 Products 

Question 1: Who is considered to be a manufacturer? 

Anyone who makes, produces or assembles a product is 

considered to be a manufacturer. If what you make is sold or 

donated, something as simple as adding ribbons to hair clips, 

knitting hats, or stringing beads into necklaces makes you a 

manufacturer. Under the law, importers are also considered to 

be manufacturers and must meet the same requirements. 

Question 2: I work part#amp;#8208;time in my home making clothes and toys for kids. Am I 

affected by this law? 

Yes, the law covers all manufacturers and importers #amp;#8208;#amp;#8208; large and small, domestic and 

foreign. All businesses, includi
[list]  

[1/1]
no. title name date
3 New Catalog & Price List !! 2010 7/2/2009
2 Guide to the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act 4/28/2009
1 New Update News for CPSIA 4/28/2009

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